A server, as the name implies, will have to be able to serve your enterprise’s needs and growing demands. Planning its infrastructure can be similar to planning the structures of kitchens for an expanding restaurant. How many kitchens (physical servers) do you need to support your menu (enterprise’s applications)?

In this article, we will be featuring 3 common server infrastructures for enterprises:

Infrastructure 1

Server Structure 1

 

In this infrastructure, the burden falls on a chef and kitchen to produce all the dishes on the menu and meet every demands. If either fails, the restaurant will not be able to operate.

In IT’s context: We will be loading all of the enterprise’s applications into one physical server. If this fails, all applications will cease to function.

Infrastructure 2

Server Structure 2

 

In this infrastructure, if one kitchen fails, the restaurant will still be able to function with the remaining kitchens. However, the restaurant will be investing in a lot of duplicated resources.

In IT’s context: We will be dedicating one physical server to support only one application, resulting in the use of numerous physical servers to support the enterprise’s operations. Each server will only be utilising a fraction of their processing capabilities.

Infrastructure 3

Server Structure 3

 

In this infrastructure, the restaurant will still be able to operate if one of the workstations is not functioning. Resources are not duplicated as only one master kitchen is used.

In the IT’s context: Our CG Virtualizer will be used to partition one physical server (master kitchen) into multiple independent sub-servers (workstations / chefs) for each application. Each will still function as a stand-alone and independent server.

Before you decide, it is best to consider a few issues like growth plans or system efficiencies.

If you’re in doubt, call us for a chat and let us talk about kitchens.